Horse Side Vet Guide ®

Equine Health Resource

Sweating, Anywhere on Body in Local Areas or Patches

Code Orange - Call Your Vet at Their First Available Office Hours

Code Yellow - Contact Your Vet at Your Convenience for an Appointment

Code Orange - Call Your Vet at Their First Available Office Hours

  • If you feel the problem is severe or has come on suddenly.

Code Yellow - Contact Your Vet at Your Convenience for an Appointment

  • If the problem seems very mild and limited to a small area.
  • If the results of the Whole Horse Exam (WHE) suggest the horse is otherwise normal.

Equine sweat glands are prevented from producing sweat by a functioning nerve supply to the skin. If that nerve supply is lost or damaged for any reason, a local area of skin may produce sweat even when the horse has not recently exercised or the weather is not particularly hot. Horses that have injured a nerve may constantly sweat in the area of skin that is supplied by that nerve.

WHAT YOUR VET DOES

Assess the area for evidence of trauma or other abnormalities such as localized muscle atrophy or muscle trembling. Look for lameness. Consider the horse’s history. Do you remember a traumatic injury near the wet spot? Share your findings and concerns with your vet.

WHAT YOUR VET DOES

Your vet assesses general health, looking for an explanation for the sign. They particularly try to rule out neurologic causes for the sign. They assess the skin area carefully for loss of sensation. Nerve damage can also occur from infectious diseases like EPM. In areas in which EPM is prevalent, they may consider EPM testing.

Author: Doug Thal DVM Dipl. ABVP

CONTACT US

We're not around right now. But you can send us an email and we'll get back to you, asap.

Sending